Thursday, February 27, 2014

CTL and Consistency of Training

I was approached by TrainingPeaks after they read some things from me on consistency, that they wanted me to provide for them. I accepted and wrote an article for them using the PMC as a way to show the affects of consistency in training, and how performance looks for an athlete with inconsistent training. This is the result, and I think if like data and training, you'll enjoy it.

The #1 Rule of Endurance Training

Amidst the intervals, data, devices, diets and all the other ways that athletes are trying to “gain an edge” in endurance training, it can be easy to forget the basics. The number one most important rule of training, which is often forgotten, is consistency. There is no training program or workout any coach can devise that can make up for a lack of consistency in training. The higher your goals are as an athlete, the more important consistency is.

As a coach, I repeatedly see the differences in performance and improvement between the athlete who is consistent in their training and the athlete who isn’t. You lose fitness at a rate of almost three times as fast as you gain it, so missing a workout or two may not hurt you, but miss a few on a regular basis and you will have a hard time making performance gains. You have to make training a daily priority.

Chronic Training Load

One of the best ways to see how consistent you are in your training is to follow your Chronic Training Load (CTL) in your Performance Management Chart (PMC). The PMC is a Premium feature within TrainingPeaks® and is also available in TrainingPeaks WKO+.
Read the rest of the article here at TrainingPeaks.com
Coach Vance

2 comments:

Dan Cole said...

For a time limited age grouper consistency can equal ~12hrs/week year round. Which leads to a much lower CTL slope. Is that a problem? Or should we deliberately do less (volume or intensity) before final build phase?

Jim Vance said...

Dan, the intensity and volume should vary thru the year. Remember, TSS is weighted toward intensity, not volume. CTL doesn't represent volume, just total stress load on the athlete.

The fitter you get, the more stress you should be able to handle.